Sgt George Miok

18 May 1981 - 30 Dec 2009


University of Alberta creates the Sergeant George R. Miok Memorial Scholarship


Funerals held for Edmonton soldiers

Tim Cook, Toronto Star January 09, 2010

SHERWOOD PARK, Alta. – They died together on a dusty road in a war-torn country far from home and were buried on the same day, in the same Alberta community, where hundreds mourned their loss.

Funerals were held Saturday in Sherwood Park for Cpl. Zachary McCormack, who was 21, and Sgt. George Miok, who was 28.

The Edmonton-based soldiers died when an improvised bomb exploded in Kandahar city Dec. 30. Also killed were Sgt. Kirk Taylor, 28, of Yarmouth, N.S.; Pte. Garrett Chidley, 21, of Cambridge, Ont.; and Calgary journalist Michelle Lang, 34.

McCormack's flag-draped coffin was solemnly carried into the church where grieving family and friends had gathered. The skirl of a lone bagpipe was the only sound as the service began.

McCormack, a member of the Loyal Edmonton Regiment, was on his first tour of duty in Afghanistan.

His commanding officer said in a statement that the young reservist was "kind-hearted, determined and tough" and was "an excellent soldier and friend."

Brig.-Gen. Michael Jorgensen, who presented McCormack's parents and fiancee with the Memorial Cross, said the soldier's incredible and infectious smile epitomized his approach to life, but ``frustrated military photographers who prefer a more grim look."

McCormack's father, Robin, described his son as the best anyone could have and told those gathered that his death has "completely devastated us."

"I'm not sure we have the strength to recover," he said in a letter read by McCormack's uncle. "It makes me cry every day that we only have 21 years of memories."

Other family members described him as a vibrant young man with a gentle soul who cared deeply about those he loved.

"Everyone who knew him, knew they were important to him," fiancee Nicole Brisson recalled. "His willingness to help other people always astounded me."

A few hours later, a second church in Sherwood Park was filled to overflowing as people came to say goodbye to Miok, also a reservist, who taught math, physical education and religion at a Catholic school in Edmonton. They were forced to stand in the doorway of the church as flags at half-mast fluttered in a gentle breeze.

Miok had served part time with the 41 Combat Engineer Regiment for 10 years. It was his second time in Afghanistan.

"Everything he had went into everything he did," remembered his friend, Master Cpl. Nathan Goisnard. "Today's service was very respectful and represented George well."

Warrant officer Dayris Litle, also a reservist, said he had a hard time functioning at his day job this week.

"It's absolutely crushing," Litle said after the service. ``This was one of the hardest weeks of my life."

Miok's commanding officer said in a statement that he was an exceptional leader to his peers and "always led from the front, regardless of the risks or hazards involved."

Miok's students were so fond of him they held a tribute at their school earlier this week and papered the hallways with photographs and personal notes.

"You were my favourite teacher and you will never be forgotten. You will be terribly missed," wrote one student. "You are our hero, our super hero, and you always made us laugh and smile."

His obituary said Miok "was so proud of the good changes that he saw in Afghanistan. He firmly believed in the importance of helping people and was determined to do more."

Both soldiers left behind large extended families.


Obituary

MIOK, George R. May 18, 1981 - December 30, 2009

On December 30, 2009, Sergeant George Miok of Edmonton passed away suddenly while serving in Afghanistan with the Canadian Forces. George, age 28, was the youngest of four brothers, raised in a loving home in Sherwood Park. George was strong, intelligent and always willing to help his friends, family and students. A gifted athlete, George loved playing sports, especially soccer, baseball, hockey, football and rugby; he also enjoyed dancing, movies and comedy.

George earned a Bachelor of Education Degree in 2005 from the University of Alberta. He went on to become a Math and Physical Education teacher at St. Cecilia Junior High School in Edmonton, a vocation he truly enjoyed. His appreciation of humanity and desire to make a difference are what compelled him to serve with the Canadian Forces in Bosnia in 2002 and again in Afghanistan in 2006. George was so proud of the good changes that he saw in Afghanistan. He firmly believed in the importance of helping people, and was determined to do more. "I'm just off to save the world - somebody has to," is how he humbly described his efforts.

George leaves behind his dad Illes (Eli); his mom Anna; his three older brothers, Michael, John, Laszlo (Les); his sister-in-law Melissa; aunt Victoria Nesic (Domo) of Austria; aunt Terez Kenyeres; uncles Janos Grof (Karolina) and Mihaly Grof (Erika) of Hungary; uncles Jozsef Grof (Mary) and Rudolf Grof (Helen); aunt Elizabeth Kovacs (Louie); godparents Jozsef and Mary Hock of Edmonton; numerous cousins in Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia and Alberta; plus his many friends. He is predeceased by his uncle Karoly Grof and grandparents Illes and Rozalia Miok and Rudolf and Rozalia Grof.

Despite his brief life, he touched so many people. George, you will be remembered forever in our hearts - we love you, and we miss you. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Saturday, January 9, 2010 at 1330 hours at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, 13 Brower Drive, Sherwood Park. Interment to follow at Our Lady of Peace Cemetery. In lieu of floral tributes, donations would be appreciated to help the family begin a George Miok Scholarship Fund at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Education. More information on this will be posted on the RIP Sergeant George Miok Facebook webpage.

The family would also like to thank all those who have already so generously given flowers and gifts - your kindness and compassion are much appreciated. To send condolences, please visit www.connelly-mckinley.com Connelly-McKinley Funeral Homes Sherwood Park-Millwoods Chapel 780-468-2222 Over 100 Years of Service


Fallen soldiers coming home

Yellow ribbons hung along routes hearses will take from airport

By Ryan Cormier, edmontonjournal.com January 8, 2010

EDMONTON — Funerals for two Edmonton-based soldiers killed in Afghanistan last month are planned for Sherwood Park on Saturday.

A service for Cpl. Zachery McCormack is scheduled for Sherwood Park Alliance Church at 11 a.m., according to family and friends.

Sgt. George Miok’s funeral is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. at Our Lady of Perpetual Help. Both funerals are tentative, because the soldiers’ bodies have not yet reached Alberta after they were repatriated at CFB Trenton earlier this week.

The flight that will bring them is expected some time Friday. When the soldiers do return, troops will be on hand to move the caskets onto a hearse, but it will not be a public event.

Yellow ribbons now adorn light poles along Gateway Boulevard and Sherwood Park Freeway along the route the soldiers will take from the airport. The ribbons were hung on Wednesday night, in a campaign organized by McCormack’s family.

“They were put up in honour of Zach,” said Glenn Purych, McCormack’s wrestling coach. “He’s coming home. He’s a hero.”

Miok and McCormack were killed in Afghanistan on Dec. 30 when their Light Armoured Vehicle triggered a roadside bomb.

Also killed were Sgt. Kirk Taylor, 28, based in Nova Scotia, and Pte. Garrett William Chidley, based in Shilo, Man.

Michelle Lang, 34, an embedded journalist from the Calgary Herald, was killed in the same blast. Lang was the first Canadian journalist to die in Afghanistan since the war started in 2002.

Lang’s funeral will be held Monday in Vancouver, where she was born and raised and where her immediate family still resides.

Miok, 28, from Sherwood Park, was a reservist with the 41 Combat Engineer Regiment and a teacher at St. Cecilia’s Junior High School. He was serving with the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team.

“George has been with the regiment for 10 years and was an exemplary senior non-commissioned officer who was an exceptional leader to his peers and subordinates,” Lt.-Col. Eppo van Weelderen, commanding officer of regiment, said Friday in a written statement.

“He will be remembered as a soldier’s soldier who always led from the front, regardless of the risks or hazards involved. George’s compassion and care for his soldiers endeared him to all who worked closely with him,” van Weelderen said.

McCormack was a member of the Loyal Edmonton Regiment, 4th Battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, serving with the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team. He has been a member of the Canadian Forces since August 2006. It was the apprentice electrician’s first overseas tour. The young Edmonton native was engaged to be married.

“Zach was an excellent soldier and friend,” Lt.-Col. Mike Prendergast, commanding officer of the Loyal Edmonton Regiment, said in a statement Friday.

“He was kind-hearted, determined and tough. His courage and dedication exemplify the best of our army and our nation. He will be terribly missed by all who knew him, but his spirit will be with us forever,” Prendergast said.

© Copyright (c) The Edmonton Journal


Explosion that killed 5 Canadians so massive it flipped LAV: military

Matthew Fisher, Canwest News Service: Tuesday, January 5, 2010

The explosion that killed journalist Michelle Lang and four Canadian soldiers last Wednesday was so massive that the 23-ton armoured vehicle that they were riding in was turned upside down and landed facing in the opposite direction.

"The vehicle flipped completely on its top about 10 metres away from the crater, off the road," Lt.-Col. Roch Pelletier, chief of operations for the Canadian brigade in Kandahar, said on Monday.

"They probably managed to put the (improvised explosive device) under the road by digging a tunnel. It was something that was put in place a few days earlier. It was not a hasty IED, as we call them. It was deliberately planned ahead and took a long time to place. ... They dug it, they placed it properly. It was all set up."

There was no way that sentries on what was a routine patrol could have seen the IED buried on a muddy dirt road, Pelletier said.

In military parlance, the IED was an HME or homemade explosive device, Pelletier said.

While declining to say how big it was because of security concerns, he said it was "a large IED" of a type "they normally use. It was standard tactics. There was nothing new."

According to The New York Times and other publications, such Taliban weapons are often made with fertilizer.

Pelletier said the insurgents who placed the IED probably had spotters in place who acted as "an early warning system that the vehicle was coming.

"(Those on the convoy) were in the wrong place at the wrong time. (The insurgents) managed to hit them very hard."

Citing security reasons, the military would not say what kind of detonator that may have been used to trigger the explosion.

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen


Family Statement

This is the family statement that was released to the media for our brother Sgt George Miok. 4 January 2010.

George was the youngest of four brothers raised in a loving home by Anna and Illes (Eli). Before George had even graduated from Archbishop Jordan High School in Sherwood Park, he was already looking ahead. In high school, he had a part-time job at a local restaurant but he felt that it wasn’t for him. He saw an Army advertisement and he decided to join the Engineers in 1998 because his father, Eli, served his country when he was in the military.

An excerpt from his Grade 12 Scrapbook titled ‘The Event That Has Changed My Life’ – This last summer, the summer of ’98, I did Basic Military Training at the Wainwright Training Base. The experience was long but it made me look at things differently. I went through many tough times, long nights, and early mornings. I got through the days with the help of friends and my own inner strength. Once, when I was in the field late at night, I looked at the sky and saw stars like I’ve never seen before and I knew that there was more to life. The whole experience made me appreciate my life more and made me think about everything I was fortunate for.

George, then 17, was happy to spend his Saturday’s and Wednesday evenings with his new friends at the Debney Armoury. He enjoyed the weekend field adventures, comradeship, and opportunity to travel; he also appreciated having money to buy gas for the car and hang out with his friends. After high school, George entered the University of Alberta where he earned a degree in Education and became a junior high school teacher in Edmonton.

A gifted athlete, George loved playing sports – especially soccer, baseball, hockey, football, and rugby. He was also a natural on the dance floor, and had many admirers when he danced the two-step with a lucky partner. Perhaps he learned those skills as a long-time member of the Hungarian Folk Dance Group.

With his family and friends, George loved watching movies and liked to laugh at funny TV shows. He loved to socialize, and was known to go for a long run after a night of merriment – just another example of his strength.

His appreciation of humanity is what compelled him to serve with the Canadian Forces in Bosnia in 2002, and again in Afghanistan in 2006. Before he left on his first overseas deployment to Bosnia, he tried to explain his decision to his mother in the following way – Canada has been good to us and I want to pay it back. He then read a passage from the Bible (The Beatitudes) that contains the following phrase: . . . Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.

George was so proud of the good changes that he saw in Afghanistan. He firmly believed in the importance of helping people, and was determined to do more. “I’m just off to save the world – somebody has to,” is how he described his efforts.

George will be loved and remembered forever by his many friends, his large extended family (aunts, uncles, and so many cousins) and his dad Illes (Eli), his mom Anna, his three older brothers Michael, John, Laszlo (Les) and his sister-in-law Melissa. The family appreciates the efforts of the news media and wishes that everyone respect their privacy during this difficult time.


Tears flow as Edmonton school pays tribute to fallen soldier who was teacher

Lisa Arrowsmith, The Canadian Press , 4 January 2010.

EDMONTON - When Marie Bolianatz, 13, heard that her former homeroom teacher, George Miok, was one of four Canadian soldiers killed last week in Afghanistan, she thought of a book that reminded her of his military mission in the poverty-stricken country. She bought a copy of Three Cups of Tea, a book about former U.S. soldier Greg Mortenson's effort to counter extremism by building schools in central Asia. She donated it in Miok's memory to the library at St. Cecilia Junior High School.

The part-time soldier and sometime bartender taught math, physical education and religion at the Catholic school in a north Edmonton neighbourhood.

"(The book) is about a man who was in the army and he leaves the army and ... encourages peace and helps the children make a school.

"I thought that reminded me a lot of Mr. Miok," Bolianatz said Monday.

Fellow students and staff members have papered the hallways with photographs, personal notes and memories of the much-loved teacher.

Bolianatz wrote a letter to Miok and pasted it up along with dozens of other such tributes.

"You were my favourite teacher and you will never be forgotten. You will be terribly missed," she wrote. "You are our hero, our super hero and you always made us laugh and smile."

Miok was killed last Wednesday along with Sgt. Kirk Taylor of Yarmouth, N.S., Cpl. Zachery McCormack of Sherwood Park, Alta., Pte. Garrett Chidley, born in Cambridge, Ont., and Michelle Lang, 34, a journalist with the Calgary Herald.

With their families looking on, their flag-draped coffins were unloaded from a military transport plane in a ceremony Sunday in Trenton, Ont.

Austin Trachuk, 13, a Grade 8 student at the school, remembered Miok as a strict teacher with a soft side, who would help students who needed extra time to learn.

Being able to write down their thoughts is likely helping his classmates cope with the tragic news, Trachuk said.

"I believe it can be helpful because you can remember all the good times you had with him," he said.

Other notes pinned to a quilt in a hallway had the messages "your smile lit up the world" and "thanks for the laughter."

Grief counsellors were at the school Monday to talk staff and students through their tears and grief.

Science teacher Ross Caria, 30, laughed as he recalled how Miok's military training came through, whether he was straightening up the staff room or conducting a physical education class.

"Chairs were lined up with military precision. He had that place the cleanest we'd ever seen. It was almost regimented," Caria said.

Miok even blew his whistle with military-sounding authority during gym classes, and to great effect, Caria said.

"Within three seconds he'd have all the boys lined up in a single file ready to go for the drill or whatever activity they were going to do," he said. "They knew his background so they knew he wasn't messing around."

Chatter in the staff room before Miok's latest deployment in the fall would sometimes turn to discussions of Canada's role in Afghanistan, the fellow teacher said.

"He would talk about the whole purpose of what they're doing there because there were always some doubters. He would tell them ... that he enjoyed the role that he was to play when he was down there and it wasn't a lost-cause mission," Caria said.

Miok often talked about the importance of training Afghan police to help ensure the safety of citizens in Kandahar. He also told his students that they were just like children in Afghanistan who were endlessly curious and wanted to know what was going on in other places.

The only exception to that observation were the occasions when Afghan children threw rocks at Canadian military vehicles, he wrote in a letter to students Nov. 8, 2009.

"They claim that it's just a fun game so it's tolerated at this point," he wrote. The letter came with several photos, including one of a smiling Miok, posing with members of the Afghan national police force.

He talked about going on security patrols and how the camp he lives on is "one of the nicest in the country."

He was proud of his role with the military's reconstruction team, he wrote. "I am pretty passionate about being able to be a part of making a difference here."

The school is organizing a memorial service for Miok, though no date has been set for it.

© Copyright 2010, Fernie Free Press


Excepts

Also Friday, the family of Edmonton-based reservist and junior high school teacher Sgt. George Miok, 28, remembered the humanity of the soldier who once told his family of his overseas military missions, "I'm just off to save the world. Somebody has to."

Miok, from Sherwood Park, Alta., a bedroom community just east of Edmonton, was a long-time member of a Hungarian folk dance group and an avid athlete who loved soccer, baseball, hockey, football and rugby, his family said in a written statement.

He first joined the military as a reservist in 1998.

In his Grade 12 scrapbook, Miok wrote about the summer he spent in basic training at a military base in Wainwright, Alta. The intense training program, and the friendships he made there, changed his outlook on life.

"The whole experience made me appreciate my life more and made me think about everything I was fortunate for," he wrote.

The combat engineer served in Bosnia in 2002 and did his first tour in Afghanistan in 2006, his family said.

Before he left on that first overseas deployment, Miok tried to explain to his mother, Anna, why he felt compelled to do it.

"Canada has been good to us and I want to pay it back," he told her.

Before his latest deployment, Miok was a little conflicted between his love for the military and his love of teaching, said David Moss, 54, a colleague at St. Cecilia Junior High School. Miok was dating and was also thinking of settling down, Moss said.

But the lure of the military camaraderie and the mission in Afghanistan was strong. "It was very difficult for George to make that decision," he said.

The children flocked to Miok one day before his deployment as he strode down the halls of the school, dressed in his full soldiers' pack and camouflage fatigues. "He had talked to them about the importance of him going and why he was going. Yeah, it was dangerous and yeah, a lot of soldiers had been killed over there. But he stressed that he really needed to do that and it was the right thing to do," Moss said.

Grief counsellors are expected to be in the school Monday and a school memorial service is tentatively scheduled for Thursday.

******

Miok, 28, joined the military driven by a sense of duty to his country and humanity, said his family.

"I'm just off to save the world -- somebody has to," is how he described his efforts, according to family.

Following in the bootsteps of his veteran father, family said Miok decided to join the army as an engineer in 1998, his last year of high school.

"This last summer, the summer of '98, I did basic military training at Wainwright Training Base. The experience was long but it made me look at things differently," he wrote in his Grade 12 scrapbook, an excerpt provided by his family.

"Once, when I was in the field late at night, I looked at the sky and saw stars like I've never seen before and I knew that there was more to life. The whole experience made me appreciate my life more and made me think about everything I was fortunate for."

Miok earned an education degree and taught junior high in Edmonton before joining the military. He later served in Bosnia in 2002 and took his first tour of Afghanistan in 2006.

- from Canadian Press, Edmonton Sun.


Sergeant George Miok ‘He looked after everybody'

Caroline Alphonso and Dawn Walton, Globe and Mail

Toronto and Calgary — From Friday's Globe and Mail

Sergeant George Miok, known as “Hollywood” to friends for the impeccable care he took of his hair and body, was remembered as the kind of leader soldiers were honoured to follow.

The 28-year-old member of 41 Combat Engineer Regiment based in Edmonton, who had previously been deployed to Bosnia where he defused land mines, was on his second tour in Afghanistan.

“He was definitely the type of guy you'd want next to you,” said Corporal Mark Fuchko, who served with Sgt. Miok in Afghanistan in 2005-06.

“He looked after everybody. He was a good leader. He was the type of guy you wanted to follow,” he added.

Brigadier-General Daniel Ménard, commander of Task Force Kandahar, recalled Sgt. Miok as a “dedicated” senior non-commissioned officer who planned “meticulously.”

“The welfare of his soldiers came first and they knew they could turn to him for advice and guidance,” he said.

Raised in Edmonton, Sgt. Miok was an elementary school teacher who joined the reserves more than a decade ago. He cared about those in his community and those he didn't know in war-torn corners of the world.

“He liked helping people,” said Master Corporal Sean Markwell, who served with Sgt. Miok in Bosnia in 2002.

His said his friend loved his job and thrived on the camaraderie of the other soldiers. He was anxious to return to Afghanistan for a second tour.

“He liked the adrenalin of it and everything we do,” MCpl. Markwell added as he reflected on their time in Bosnia where he performed one of the mission's most dangerous jobs.

“You know something could happen, but you know it's just part of the job. It's the risk you take.”


Slain soldier Miok was torn between the army and teaching

By Laura Drake, Edmonton Journal December 31, 2009

Sgt. George Miok, 28, based in Edmonton, died when his armoured vehicle hit an improvised explosive device four kilometres south of Kandahar City. He was remembered as a “dedicated” officer that was well-liked by his troops.

EDMONTON — Sgt. George Miok wasn't sure he wanted to go back to Afghanistan a second time. The Edmonton-based reservist was also a teacher who had spent the 2008-09 school year at St. Cecilia's Junior High School in Edmonton.

"George was torn. He had two loves. . . . He was torn between going back to Afghanistan and wanting to become a teacher full-time," said David Moss, who was part of a team that hired Miok to teach religion, math, gym and health to the school's Grade 7 students.

"George was a unique individual. He was very enthusiastic and outgoing, had a huge smile. He was very gregarious. He bonded well with the kids."

Miok — one of four Canadian soldiers killed in an IED explosion in Kandahar on Wednesday, which also claimed the life of Canwest News Service journalist Michelle Lang — was a member of 41 Combat Engineer Regiment and serving with the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team.

Brig.-Gen. Daniel Menard, Commander of Task Force Kandahar, said Miok was a "dedicated" officer who was well-liked by his troops. "The welfare of his soldiers came first, and they knew they could turn to him for advice and guidance."

Moss said Miok, 28, already had one tour under his belt when he started at the school. He considered becoming a teacher full-time after that year, but positions were scarce and the second Afghanistan tour was a sure thing.

Moreover, Miok had been promoted to Sergeant, and the tour that left Edmonton in September afforded him the opportunity to work directly with the Afghan National Army, Moss said.

He kept in touch with his former school, though, sending e-mails that were shared with the students on Remembrance Day. Moss said he last got an e-mail from Miok right before Christmas.

"All is well on this front as we are making as much progress as we can," Miok wrote in the e-mail, which he ended by including a poem based on the Night Before Christmas about a soldier alone for the holidays.

"Working as an Infantry Section Commander with the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team is a very dynamic and rewarding position," he continued. "It's not ideal to be spending Christmas here but I'm surrounded by some of the best Canadians that a guy can serve with."

Miok, who was not married and did not have children, liked to keep busy. In addition to his duties as a reservist, he also bartended at the Rose and Crown, a downtown Edmonton pub.

Dan Shaw, the pub's general manager, said he wasn't sure if he could break the news to his staff Thursday.

"He was an unbelievable guy. I came out here last February. He was the first guy I met when I came out here," Shaw said Thursday morning.

"I didn't realize he was in the reserves in the first few weeks. I just thought he was incredibly well-regimented and polite."

Shaw said the pub had a big going-away party for Miok before he deployed in September. Most of the staff was surprised he decided to re-deploy, since Miok talked often of becoming a full-time teacher.

"It caught us all off-guard, but we had to respect his decision," Shaw said. "We were all worried about it at the time."

Shaw said Miok had a brother and parents in the Edmonton area. When reached at home, Miok's father said he wasn't quite ready to talk about his son.

"He just, he did his duty," he said.

© Copyright (c) Canwest News Service


Four Canadian soldiers and one Canadian reporter killed and five injured in an IED strike

CEFCOM NR - 09.035 - December 31, 2009

OTTAWA – Four Canadian soldiers and one Canadian reporter embedded with Joint Task Force Afghanistan (JTF-Afg) were killed, while four other Canadian soldiers and one Canadian civilian official were injured in an IED incident in Kandahar province, on Wednesday December 30, 2009.

The incident occurred 4 km south of Kandahar City at approximately 4:00 p.m., Kandahar time, Wednesday afternoon as a result of an improvised explosive device attack on an armoured vehicle during a patrol.

Killed in action was Sergeant George Miok a member of 41 Combat Engineer Regiment, based in Edmonton, Alberta and serving with the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team.

Killed in action was Sergeant Kirk Taylor a member of 84 Independent Field Battery, Royal Canadian Artillery, based in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia and serving with the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team.

Killed in action was Corporal Zachery McCormack a member of the Loyal Edmonton Regiment, 4th Battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, based in Edmonton, Alberta and serving with the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team.

Killed in action was Private Garrett William Chidley a member of the 2nd Battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, based in Shilo, Manitoba and serving with the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team.

Michelle Lang, a Canwest journalist from Calgary, embedded with the Canadian Forces in Afghanistan was killed in the same incident.

Four Canadian soldiers and one Canadian civilian official were also seriously wounded in the incident. All of the injured were evacuated by helicopter to the Multi-National Medical Facility at Kandahar Airfield. The injured soldiers and civilian are reported to be in stable condition.

Members of Task Force Kandahar are committed to improving security and increasing development in Kandahar Province. Our thoughts are with the loved ones of our fallen comrades and our prayers go out to the family and friends of our fallen civilian reporter during this sad time, but we are determined to continue working with our Afghan and international partners towards a better future for the people of Afghanistan.

- 30 -

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