Sgt Martin Goudreault

19 November 1974 - 6 June 2010

 


Goudreault Park


Mourning the loss

Community shows support as fallen soldier laid to rest

The Temiskaming Speaker, 16 June 2010

TEMISKAMING SHORES (Staff) - The realities of the war in Afghanistan came home to Temiskaming as the area paid tribute to a soldier killed in the line of duty.

Sergeant Martin Goudreault, the 35-year-old son of Micheline and Aurel Goudreault of Temiskaming Shores, was killed by a makeshift bomb while on foot patrol southwest of Kandahar City June 6.

Funeral services were held Tuesday, June 15 at Paroisse Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours in Belle Vallée.

Downtown New Liskeard fell silent as more than 1,000 area residents and school children lined the streets while the funeral procession made its way from Perrin Funeral Chapel to the Belle Vallée church.

More than 500 mourners filled the church for the 11 a.m. service. It was attended by dozens of uniformed officers from the Canadian Forces, including many who had served with Sergeant Goudreault.

CAREER

The Sudbury native, born November 19, 1974, had made the military his career.

He joined the reserve component of the Forces in 1993 as a member of the Algonquin Regiment.

In November, 1995, he transferred to the regular force and became a member of the Canadian Military Engineers.

After completing his training at the Canadian Forces School of Military Engineering in Chilliwack, B.C., he was posted to 1 Combat Engineer Regiment in Chilliwack.

He was a seasoned soldier, serving two tours in the former republic of Yugoslavia and was on his third tour in Afghanistan at the time of his death.

He had most recently been deployed as a reconnaissance sergeant in 2 Field Troop, 23 Field Engineer Squadron, 1 Royal Canadian Regiment Battle Group, based in Edmonton.

In a statement, his unit described him as “an extremely hard working soldier who displayed professionalism and dedication at all times even during extremely stressful events.

“As a friend, he was always there and would drop whatever he was doing to help out, even at a moment’s notice. He was a career soldier who quickly seized every opportunity to improve himself and could always be counted on to accept any challenge.

“Sgt. Goudreault was doing the job he loved - leading soldiers on deployment.”

His body was returned to Canadian Forces Base Trenton June 9 in a repatriation ceremony attended by his family, Governor General Michaëlle Jean, Defence Minister Peter MacKay, and General Walt Natynczyk, chief of the defence staff.

On Sunday, June 13, a procession made its way from Toronto to New Liskeard, escorted by members of the Ontario Provincial Police.

It arrived in New Liskeard shortly before 3 p.m. escorted by police officers and Temiskaming Shores firefighters.

Some 200 people, many carrying Canadian flags, had gathered. They stood in silence as members of the Forces and the OPP carried the flag-draped coffin into the funeral home.

FAMILY STATEMENT

Earlier that day, Sergeant Goudreault’s family expressed their gratitude to everyone who had offered prayers, gifts of flowers and food, and support.

In a statement, they also thanked the Canadian Forces, “who went above and beyond the call of duty to facilitate in preparations and to ensure our comfort.”

“The respect and honour given to Martin and our family was a healing balm to our deep sorrow, helping to mould our grief into a swelling pride. We have never been so proud to be Canadian.”

They continued: “The overwhelming patriotic gratitude poured out by the public has made our loss bearable and has turned something tragic into something beautiful.

“We covet your prayers and will always hold high the memory of Martin and the life he willingly gave for our country.”

Books of condolence were available for the public to sign at Temiskaming Shores city hall, the Waterfront Pool-Fitness Centre and the New Liskeard post office, where Sergeant Goudreault’s father works.


People line streets to pay respects to fallen soldier

June 15, 2010. The Canadian Press

NEW LISKEARD, ONT. —Downtown New Liskeard, Ont., was silent today as people lined the streets to pay respects to Sgt. Martin Goudreault.

The 35-year-old soldier died last week when a bomb exploded west of Kandahar city.

A “route of honour” was arranged so people could pay respects as the Goudreault family made their way north to Belle Vallee for the funeral.

Local students joined other residents who stood in silence holding Canadian flags as the procession went through.

Goodreault, a member of Edmonton-based 1 Combat Engineer Regiment, had been on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan and his fifth deployment overseas.

Though Goodreault was originally from Sudbury, his parents and other family now live in the New Liskeard area about 150 kilometres to the northeast.


Martin Goudreault

On June 6, 2010, Martin Goudreault of Gibbons, Alberta, died in Kandahar, Afghanistan. He was born in Sudbury on November 19, 1974, to Aurel Goudreault and Micheline Touzin Goudreault. Educated at St. Thomas Aquinas in Red Deer, Alberta, he joined the Department of National Defense and served from 1995-2010. Mr. Goudreault is survived by his parents Aurel and Micheline; sisters Chantal Rohovich and Valérie Malinowski; and five nephews and nieces. The funeral was arranged by Perrin Funeral Chapel in New Liskeard with burial in Belle Vallée. His sisters, grandfather, uncles and aunts, cousins, nephews and nieces visited from out of town. Condolences and donations may be left at www.perrinfuneralchapel.com.


Killed in Afghanistan

City family mourns soldier son killed serving country

The Temiskaming Speaker, 9 June 2010

TEMISKAMING SHORES (Staff) - The son of a Temiskaming Shores couple who was killed earlier this week while serving in Afghanistan is being remembered as an easy-going man who wanted to make a difference.

Sergeant Martin Goudreault “was doing what he truly wanted to do -- be in the army,” said Aurel and Micheline Goudreault.

Sergeant Goudreault, 35, died Sunday, June 6 when an improvised explosive device, or makeshift bomb, detonated while he was on foot patrol near Kandahar City.

He was born in Sudbury and attended school in Red Deer, Alberta.

VETERAN

A 15-year veteran of the Canadian Armed Forces, he had been with the Edmonton-based 1 Combat Engineer Regiment and was serving in Afghanistan as a member of the 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment Battle Group.

The Department of National Defence said the explosion occurred about 15 kilometres southwest of Kandahar City, in the Panjwayi District in southeastern Afghanistan, at about 6:30 a.m. Kandahar time.

He is the ninth Canadian soldier killed in Afghanistan this year and the 147th member of the Canadian military to die in the conflict since 2002.

“We are both incredibly proud of Martin,” said his parents in a statement issued June 8.

They said he had joined the engineers because it was a challenge “and he was always challenging himself.” He completed the combat diver course because it was the most difficult at the time, they said. Their son was in his element when on the water and loved boating. They recalled that he once travelled to the United States for lifeguard certification so he could provide services in a community in need of a trained lifeguard. “He just loved people,” they said.

“He never argued, he was funny and he always had so much energy. He was a joker who like to kid around and he never sweated the small stuff,” they continued.

“When it came to his job, his men always came first. His priority was looking after his troops and he was easy to talk to.”

Nor was he afraid to say what was on his mind, they said.

“When he went on his first tour to Afghanistan, he was really gung-ho to get over there and do his part. After he went over there and saw the kids, he realized he needed to go back and make a difference.

“And he knew he was making a difference.”

In addition to his parents, Sergeant Goudreault is survived by two sisters, a grandfather, and an extended family of aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins.

A repatriation ceremony is to be held Wednesday, June 9 at 2 p.m. at Canadian Forces Base Trenton. The Governor General, National Defence Minister MacKay and General Walt Natynczyk, chief of the defence staff, are expected to be among the dignitaries present.

Sergeant Goudreault will be buried in Belle Vallée. Funeral details were not available at press time.


Soldier died doing what he loved

Sergeant was the sort you’d want in your corner, colleagues say

By TARA BRAUTIGAM The Canadian Press, Tue. Jun 8 - 4:53 AM

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — Lt. Matthew Hoare won’t soon forget the battlefield lessons he learned from Sgt. Martin Goudreault.

"The guidance that he gave me personally is something that I will always carry with me," Hoare said of Goudreault, who on Sunday became the latest Canadian soldier to die in Afghanistan when he was killed by the blast of a makeshift bomb.

"It’s a loss I think we’re all going to feel."

Before dawn Tuesday, hundreds of soldiers gathered on the tarmac of Kandahar Airfield to share in that loss. A procession of military pallbearers carried Goudreault’s flag-draped casket and placed it into the back of a military aircraft, where it began its long journey back to Canada.

Goudreault, a member of 1 Combat Engineer Regiment, based in Edmonton, was looking for a stockpile of insurgent weapons when the blast occurred shortly after sunrise near the village of Nakhonay, in the perilous Panjwaii district west of Kandahar city.

The 35-year-old sergeant was more aware than most of the dangers inherent in leading such a patrol — he was on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan and fifth deployment overseas.

But those who knew him say he wouldn’t have had it any other way.

"Sgt. Goudreault died (doing) what he loved doing best: leading his section from the front," Brig.-Gen. Jon Vance, the commander of Task Force Kandahar, told a news conference Monday at the airfield.

"If your way of life was in peril, you would want someone like Sgt. Martin Goudreault to show up and offer to help."

"Insurgents hide their weapons and IEDs amongst the civilian population and soldiers like Martin, both Canadian and Afghan, are working each and every day to find and eliminate these weapons caches," Vance said.

A native of Sudbury, Ont., and known as Marty to his friends, Goudreault was a 15-year veteran of the Canadian Forces who was serving with the 1st Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment when he died.

"Recognized early in his career for his leadership, Sgt. Goudreault was a model soldier, someone the soldiers in his section could look up to and emulate," Vance said. "His subordinates and superiors alike will remember him as a tireless leader who was passionate about his work."

Prime Minister Stephen Harper expressed his condolences to Goudreault’s family and friends and paid tribute to his efforts to bring stability to Afghanistan.

"The lives of the Afghan people are better due to the efforts of Canadians like Sgt. Goudreault, who provide security and stability," Harper said in a statement.

"These are the cornerstones that will allow the country to rebuild and grow into the future."

Gov. Gen. Michaelle Jean said she was profoundly saddened by the news.

"Yet again, we have received a cruel reminder of the dangers that daily confront our troops deployed to this troubled area of the world," she said in a statement.

"We admire them all the more as their sense of duty compels them to answer their country’s call with valour, determination and incredible generosity."

Jawed Ludin, Afghanistan’s ambassador to Canada, also extended his sympathies in a statement.

"It is with a heavy heart that I join Canadians in mourning the death of Martin Goudreault, the latest sacrifice by a Canadian soldier who served proudly in Afghanistan helping the people move closer to the long cherished dream of peace, prosperity and democracy."


Canadian soldier killed by IED in Afghanistan

By Matthew Fisher, Canwest News Service June 7, 2010 2:02 AM

KANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan — Sgt. Martin Goudreault, of 1 Combat Engineer Regiment in Edmonton, became the 147th Canadian to die in Afghanistan when he was killed by a homemade landmine just before dawn on Sunday while on a foot patrol about 15 kilometres southwest of Kandahar City.

Goudreault, who was known as Marty to his friends, was from Sudbury, Ont., and had just begun his third tour in Afghanistan. The sapper was leading a patrol comprised of other members of the Royal Canadian Regiment battle group near the town of Nakhoney, when he was killed by the improvised explosive device.

Goudreault's patrol had earlier been searching for weapon caches in a remote part of Panjwaii District, which was controlled by the Taliban until Canadian Forces cleared the area of insurgents and began living among the population there several months ago.

"If your way of life was in peril, you would want someone like Sgt. Martin Goudreault to show up and offer you help," said Brig.-Gen. Jon Vance, the Task Force Kandahar commander.

"Sgt. Goudreault died doing what he loved best: leading his section from the front. His subordinates and superiors alike will remember him as a tireless leader who was passionate about his work.

Vance's remarks were his first public comments since being named nine days ago as an emergency replacement for Brig.-Gen. Daniel Menard who was suddenly sent home amid allegations of a sex scandal. Vance arrived back in Kandahar four days ago. He was the task force commander here last year.

Goudreault, 35, was on his fifth foreign tour. Although based in Western Canada, the Franco-Ontarian was attached to a unit from Petawawa, Ont., for this rotation in Afghanistan.

"Recognized early in his career for his leadership, Martin was a tremendous asset to his battle group and Task Force Kandahar," Vance said. "Always looking for a challenge, Martin was a qualified combat diver and had the highest personal standards of technical and tactical expertise."

The bulk of Canada's combat forces are now concentrated in Panjwaii, which senior NATO officers have often said is one of the most volatile areas in Kandahar and a key to rolling back the Taliban across their heartland in the south.

With Goudreault's death, nine Canadian soldiers have died in Afghanistan this year. The last to die before Goudreault was Trooper Larry Rudd of the Royal Canadian Dragoons on May 24.

© Copyright (c) Canwest News Service


Soldier killed by IED in Afghanistan

By Matthew Fisher, Canwest News Service June 7, 2010 12:05 AM

KANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan — Sgt. Martin Goudreault of 1 Combat Engineer Regiment in Edmonton is the 147th Canadian to die in Afghanistan.

Goudreault, who was known as Marty to his friends, was from Sudbury, Ont., and had just begun his third tour in Afghanistan.

He was on a foot patrol with other members of the Royal Canadian Regiment battle group near the town of Nakhoney, in Panjwaii District, when he was killed by an improvised explosive device.

The sapper’s patrol had earlier been searching for weapons caches in the remote part of Panjwaii District, about 15 kilometres southwest of Kandahar City.

© Copyright (c) Canwest News Service

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